A Sad Announcement

I REALLY HATE SEEING THIS

dough snow

Hey buddies.

This is so difficult to tell you.

We came to a really hard decision this weekend. We’re closing Dough. The last day will be Sunday, September 14th.

You guys have been the best customers ever. You’ve been kind and patient as we built the business from it’s first Stealth Sunday experiments. And we’re going to miss you.

We love how Dough has become a community hub and Sundays are really magical. Friends and families meeting up for a lazy Sunday breakfast, meeting each other, making new friends. We hope something else rises to fill the void.

Our employees are almost as sad as we are about this. They’re awesome folks and if you know of any job openings that would be a good fit, please pass them along: [email protected].

Atlanta is a small town for such a big city and if we don’t see you this week, I’m sure we’ll see you around.

Thanks for the memories,

Team Dough

Apple Introduces the iPhone 6 & iPhone 6 Plus

Image of Apple Introduces the iPhone 6 & iPhone 6 Plus

Phone 6 is merely 6.9mm while the Plus clocks in at just 7.1mm. Both phones employ Apple’s latest Retina HD display, each boasting the full sRGB wide color gamut and dual-domain pixels on the photo-aligned IPS display for a wider angle of view. While the iPhone 6 sports a 4.7″ display at a resolution of 1334 by 750 with 326 pixels per inch, the Plus sports a 5.5″ display with full 1080p resolution at 1920 by 1080 with 401 pixels per inch — thus giving the two phones more than one million and two million pixels, respectively.

Taking advantage of the iPhone 6 Plus’s screen is the inclusion of a brand new landscape view. Essentially a modified take on that of the iPad and optimized for the device, the view is available for everything from the home screen to the apps themselves and also includes extra functionality thanks to a larger on-screen keyboard.

Powering the phones is the Apple-designed A8 chip, which offers up to 25% faster processing power and 50% faster graphics — improvements that effectively make the 6 50 times faster than the original iPhone with graphics that are 84 times faster. Working in conjunction with the A8 is an M8 coprocessor that continuously measures motion data from the accelerometer, gyroscope, and compass while a new built-in barometer senses air pressure to measure relative elevation — all of which are perfect for the included iOS 8 and its flagship Health app.

Additional improvements over its predecessor include faster LTE — and more bands than any other smartphone for better roaming — Voice over LTE, 802.11ac for Wi-Fi speeds up to three times faster than the iPhone 5s, and the inclusion of Wi-Fi calling for making high-quality calls when cell conditions are poor.

The iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus mark a complete overhaul to Apple’s iSight camera for improved photos and video. The new 8MP iSight features 1.5µ pixels, ƒ/2.2 aperture, and an all-new sensor along with DSLR-inspired Focus Pixels and software improvements like faster autofocus, next-generation local tone mapping, and advanced noise reduction. Furthermore, Apple’s A8 chip includes an image signal processor that helps with both shaky hands and low light while burst mode detects smiles and blinks in order to recommend the best picture.

The new phone also represents Apple’s latest advances in video as it looks to “replace” the video camera in much the same way that it’s done to point-and-shoots. A new Apple-designed video encoder allows for the capture of slow-mo video at 120 fps or 240 fps, cinematic video stabilization basically turns your phone into a steady-cam, and continuous autofocus makes focus changes automatic and nearly undetectable.

Joining the overhauled iSight is a new FaceTime HD camera with an all-new sensor and larger ƒ/2.2 aperture that lets in over 80% more light. It even includes a burst mode that can capture up to 10 photos per second, improved face detection, and single-shot HDR photos.

Last but not least, users can customize their phones with new in-house silicone cases — available in six different colors, including a special (PRODUCT)RED edition — or five different colorways of Apple’s latest leather case.

Available in gold, silver, and space grey with 16, 64, and 128GB of storage, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus start at $199 and $299 USD (with a two-year carrier contract), respectively, and are due out September 19. Pre-orders begin September 12.

Hawks discipline GM Danny Ferry for racist comments

Danny Ferry, Hawks President of Basketball Operations and GM

The fallout from racially charged comments by Atlanta Hawks’ leadership continued on Tuesday as general manager Danny Ferry was disciplined for making inflammatory remarks about Luol Deng.

Hawks CEO Steve Koonin has imposed undisclosed discipline on Ferry for comments the GM made to the ownership group in June when the team pursued Deng as a free agent.

Atlanta media outlets obtained a letter Monday night from Hawks co-owner Michael Gearon Jr. which cites Ferry telling the ownership group that Deng “has a little African in him.”

Gearon’s letter on June 12 to co-owner Bruce Levenson said Ferry went on to say, “Not in a bad way, but he’s like a guy who would have a nice store out front and sell you counterfeit stuff out of the back.”

Added Gearon: “Ferry completed the racial slur by describing the player (and impliedly all persons of African descent) as a two-faced liar and cheat.”

Deng, 29, was born in what is now South Sudan. His father moved his family to Egypt and then England. The 10-year NBA veteran is now a British citizen and played for England in the 2012 Olympics.

Deng, like Ferry, also played at Duke.

In his letter, Gearon recommended that Ferry resign or be fired.

He warned Levenson he believed Ferry’s comments “could be fatal to the franchise” if made public.

Gearon said he and the other co-owners “were appalled that anyone would make such a racist slur under any circumstance, much less the GM of an NBA franchise on a major conference call.”

Gearon declined to comment when contacted by The Associated Press on Tuesday and Deng’s agent, Ron Shade, could not be immediately reached.

Hawks spokesman Garin Narain said the team’s investigation of Ferry’s comments uncovered a racially inflammatory email written two years ago by Levenson. That discovery led to Levenson’s announcement Sunday that he will sell his controlling share of the team.

Ferry apologized Tuesday but said he was only repeating what he had heard about Deng.

“In regards to the insensitive remarks that were used during our due diligence process, I was repeating comments that were gathered from numerous sources during background conversations and scouting about different players,” Ferry said in a statement released by the team.

“I repeated those comments during a telephone conversation reviewing the draft and free agency process. Those words do not reflect my views, or words that I would use to describe an individual and I certainly regret it. I apologize to those I offended and to Luol, who I reached out to Monday morning.”

Koonin has agreed to meet with Atlanta civil rights leaders on Wednesday. The Rev. Markel Hutchins said Monday he asked for the meeting to discuss what he believes is a racist attitude throughout the organization.

In his letter to Levenson, Gearon compared Ferry’s remarks to racist comments which forced Donald Sterling to sell the Clippers.

“We believe these comments by Ferry were far worse than Sterling’s because they were not from a private personal conversation — they were in a business environment on a business matter in front of a dozen or more people,” Gearon wrote. “If Ferry would make such a slur in a semi-public forum, we can only imagine what he has said in smaller groups or to individuals.”

Gearon also said in the letter that he wanted to point out Ferry’s comments to Levenson because he wasn’t sure Levenson was listening to the full conference call. Gearon said his belief, confirmed by his consultations with two attorneys, was the fallout from Ferry’s comments could be “devastating.”

Ferry was named the Hawks’ general manager in 2012. He came to Atlanta after two years as vice president of basketball operations for the San Antonio Spurs. As general manager for the Cleveland Cavaliers from 2005-2010, Ferry helped build a team that advanced to the 2007 NBA Finals.

There was renewed optimism about the direction of the team after Ferry hired coach Mike Budenholzer from San Antonio in 2013 and Budenholzer began to implement the Spurs’ system. Despite losing center Al Horford to a season-ending injury, the Hawks made the playoffs and lost to Indiana in a competitive first-round series.

The turmoil resulting from the inflammatory comments from Ferry and Levenson threatens to derail any momentum gained last season. New ownership must be found, and Ferry’s ability to survive the crisis is unknown.

One key issue Ferry now must address: Can he draw interest from future free agents?

In his letter of apology, Ferry pledged he would learn from the incident.

“I am committed to learning from this and deeply regret this situation,” Ferry said. “I fully understand we have work to do in order to help us create a better organization; one that our players and fans will be proud of, on and off the court, and that is where my focus is moving forward.”

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