Black Congressman Pleads With FBI Director To Do Something About Police Killings

Representative Elijah Cummings, a Democrat from Maryland and ranking member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, waits to begin a hearing with James Comey, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, July 7, 2016. Comey is appearing before the committee to explain his finding that no reasonable prosecutor would bring a criminal case against Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, even though she and her staff were extremely careless in their handling of highly classified information. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Representative Elijah Cummings, a Democrat from Maryland and ranking member of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee, waits to begin a hearing with James Comey, director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), not pictured, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, July 7, 2016. Comey is appearing before the committee to explain his finding that no reasonable prosecutor would bring a criminal case against Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee, even though she and her staff were extremely careless in their handling of highly classified information. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

WASHINGTON ― Five hours into a hearing with FBI director James Comey about Hillary Clinton’s emails, Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) changed the subject to something a bit more important: black people being killed by police officers.

Cummings, who is black, all but begged Comey to do something to help break the pattern of unarmed black people being killed by police. Just this week, Alton Sterling was shot dead in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, while selling CDs outside of a convenience store, and Philando Castile was shot and killed near St. Paul, Minnesota, after being pulled over for a busted tail light.

“Mr. Director, if you do nothing else in your 2,000-plus days left, you have to go help us get a hold of this issue,” Cummings said. “It is so painful. I can’t even begin to tell you.”

The Maryland Democrat said he woke up Thursday morning “to my wife literally crying” while watching a video of Sterling being shot. Then she watched the video of Castile bleeding out in his car.

“I hope you watch them,” he told Comey. “There’s something wrong with this picture.”

Cummings, who represents the majority of the mostly black neighborhoods of Baltimore, said he’s fortunate he’s never been harmed by police. Still, he said he’s been pulled over “50 million times” for no clear reason, and it’s all connected to people of color being targeted by law enforcement.

“As an African American man in this country, 66 years old, moving toward the twilight of my life, we cannot allow black men to continue being slaughtered,” he said.

Comey sat quietly as Cummings spoke, but didn’t respond.

Dallas sniper attack 5 officers killed

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A suspect in a deadly police ambush in Dallas told negotiators that he was upset about recent police shootings, that he wanted to kill white people — especially white officers — and that he acted alone, the city’s police chief told reporters Friday.
Police killed the suspect with an explosive device after a standoff that lasted for hours, Chief David Brown said.

“We saw no other option but to use our bomb robot and place a device on its extension for it to detonate where the suspect was,” Brown said. “Other options would have exposed our officers to grave danger. The suspect is deceased as a result of detonating the bomb.”

Five police officers were killed and seven others were injured in the ambush, which began during a protest over police violence Thursday night, officials have said. It was the deadliest single incident for U.S. law enforcement since September 11, 2001. Two civilians also were injured in the shootings, the Dallas mayor’s office said.
The deadly gunfire erupted in Dallas as videos showing two African-American men shot by police in Louisiana and Minnesota spurred protests and debate over police use of force across the country.
Brown told reporters it’s too soon to speculate on the suspect’s motives, and it’s unclear whether more suspects are on the loose.
“We’re hurting. Our profession is hurting. There are no words to describe the atrocity that happened in our city,” he said. “All I know is that this must stop — this divisiveness between our police and our citizens.”

Source: CNN

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