Ricky Rubio To Miss 7-8 Weeks

Minnesota Timberwolves point guard Ricky Rubiois out indefinitely because of a badly sprained left ankle.

Rubio could be sidelined for seven to eight weeks, according to USA Today.

Coach Flip Saunders said Rubio would be on crutches the next 10 days to two weeks and will then be reevaluated. He would not confirm speculation Rubio could be out as many as two months.

Rubio was injured in his team’s game at Orlando on Friday night. An MRI exam performed Saturday confirmed the severity of the sprain.

“He’s in good spirits,” Saunders said before Minnesota faced the Miami Heat, not long after Rubio hobbled into the arena on crutches with a boot protecting his ankle. “He feels good. Anyone who knows Ricky, he went through his knee situation a few years ago, he’s an extremely hard worker. So he’ll get back. If anyone is going to get back as soon as they can, he’d be a guy that would.”

Rubio agreed to a $55 million, four-year contract extension with the Timberwolves on Oct. 31. He entered Saturday as one of only four players with at least 50 assists this season.

With Rubio out, the Timberwolves will rely more on Mo Williams at the point, though Saunders said he’s leery of playing the veteran more than 25 minutes a night. In Saturday’s 102-92 loss to the Heat, Williams recorded two points, four rebounds and five assists in 22 minutes off the bench.

Rookie Zach LaVine, who logged a total of 13 minutes in Minnesota’s five games entering Saturday, also will become a bigger part of the rotation, Saunders said. LaVine started against Miami and scored five points in 26 minutes of action.

With him and Andrew Wiggins on the floor together, Minnesota became the first team in nine years to start a pair of teenagers. The last team to do that was the Atlanta Hawks, who had Josh Smith and Marvin Williams in the lineup together against the Los Angeles Clippers on Nov. 4, 2005.

“He didn’t shy away from the stage,” Saunders said of LaVine.

Rubio is averaging 9.4 points and 10 assists this season.

Minnesota will remain in Miami through Monday, which means Rubio will have a couple extra days to potentially see swelling in the ankle subside before he flies home.

“He can’t put any weight on it to get any kind of weight-bearing X-ray,” Saunders said. “Two weeks, we’ll be able to look at it and then we’ll know.”

Steve Nash pens a letter to angry Los Angeles Lakers fans

http://l2.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/QPUpxIekGWnUMpMxgksUuw--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTQzNjtweW9mZj0wO3E9NzU7dz03MjQ-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/afp.com/8cba402a852bba33f3c6d5e0668a3fa7ec2b99a1.jpg

I definitely don’t want to be a distraction, but I felt it best everyone heard from me in my own words.

I have a ton of miles on my back. Three bulging disks (a tear in one), stenosis of the nerve route and spondylolisthesis. I suffer from sciatica and after games I often can’t sit in the car on the drive home, which has made for some interesting rides. Most nights I’m bothered by severe cramping in both calves while I sleep, a result of the same damn nerve routes, and the list goes on somewhat comically. That’s what you deserve for playing over 1,300 NBA games. By no means do I tell you this for sympathy – especially since I see these ailments as badges of honor – but maybe I can bring some clarity.

I’ve always been one of the hardest workers in the game and I say that at the risk of what it assumes. The past 2 years I’ve worked like a dog to not only overcome these setbacks but to find the form that could lift up and inspire the fans in LA as my last chapter. Obviously it’s been a disaster on both fronts but I’ve never worked harder, sacrificed more or faced such a difficult challenge mentally and emotionally.

I understand why some fans are disappointed. I haven’t been able to play a lot of games or at the level we all wanted. Unfortunately that’s a part of pro sports that happens every year on every team. I wish desperately it was different. I want to play more than anything in the world. I’ve lost an incredible amount of sleep over this disappointment.

Competitiveness, professionalism, naiveté and hope that at some point I’d turn a corner has kept me fighting to get back. As our legendary trainer Gary Vitti, who is a close friend, told me, ‘You’re the last to know’ – and my back has shown me the forecast over the past 18-20 months. To ignore it any longer is irresponsible. But that doesn’t mean that life stops.

This may be hard for people to understand unless you’ve played NBA basketball, but there is an incredible difference between this game and swinging a golf club, hiking, even hitting a tennis ball or playing basketball at the park. Fortunately those other activities aren’t debilitating, but playing an NBA game usually puts me out a couple of weeks. Once you’re asked to accelerate and decelerate with Steph Curry and Kyrie Irving it is a completely different demand.

I’m doing what I’ve always done which is share a bit of my off-court life in the same way everyone else does. Going forward I hope we all can refocus our energies on getting behind these Lakers. This team will be back and Staples will be rocking.

Skip to toolbar