Russell Simmons’s Statement on Rape Allegations

Russell Simmons released a statement to The New York Times in response to four women who accused him of violent sexual behavior, including three who accused him of rape. In his statement, Mr. Simmons denied the accusations.

[Music Mogul Russell Simmons Is Accused of Rape by 3 Women]

The complete statement from Mr. Simmons appears below:

I vehemently deny all these allegations. These horrific accusations have shocked me to my core and all of my relations have been consensual.

I am blessed to have shared extraordinary relationships, whether through work or love, with many great women; and I have enormous respect for the women’s movement worldwide and their struggle for respect, dignity, equality and power. I am devastated by any reason I may have given to anyone to say or think of me in the ways that are currently being described. In recent weeks, some former business, creative and romantic partners have aired grievances as claims I categorically reject. In some of these instances, financial motives and direct contradictory witness testimony has been supplied to the media, which has been completely left out of stories. In the last few days, one woman attempted to extort me for $500,000 only to recant her ridiculous claim. The current allegations sent to me by The New York Times range from the patently untrue to the frivolous and hurtful. The presumption of innocent until proven guilty must not be replaced by “Guilty by Accusation.”

I have already apologized for the instances of thoughtlessness in my consensual relations. I have separated myself from my businesses and charities in order to not become a distraction. I have re-dedicated myself to spiritual learning, healing and working on behalf of the communities to which I have devoted my life. I have accepted that I can and should get dirt on my sleeves if it means witnessing the birth of a new consciousness about women. What I will not accept is responsibility for what I have not done. I have conducted my life with a message of peace and love. Although I have been candid about how I have lived in books and interviews detailing my flaws, I will relentlessly fight against any untruthful character assassination that paints me as a man of violence.

I Want You (From “Star” Season 2) – Single

 

Written and Produced by my self, Johnta Austin and Bryan Michael Cox

How J Dilla Used the MPC3000 to Make His Mark on Hip-Hop History

Arguably the two most pivotal moments in hip-hop history were the advent of the drum machine and the embrace of sampling, and over the course of hip-hop’s development, the movement’s most influential figures, from Dr. Dre to DJ Premier all commonly wielded both of these tools to make their mark on what is now unequivocally America’s most popular music. By the early 1990’s, fully customizable sampling machines like Akai’s MCP 3000 reigned supreme, and one legendary producer had an ability to use it that was head and shoulders above the rest: the late J Dilla.

Dilla’s MPC 3000 is now being honored in the National Museum of African American History in Washington, D.C.. His loose, intentionally imperfect drumming style is enshrined in hip-hop history and still largely inspires artists in various corners of the rap and hip-hop space today. In a new Vox feature that delves into the beloved beat maker’s distinctly renown style and equipment of choice, Dilla’s distinguished technique is described as “humanizing” in the way that he would circumvent his MPC’s quantization capabilities and manually place his beats with keen rhythmic improvisation.

Well worth the watch, the video dives into a revealing lesson in hip-hop and electronic production history behind the work of one iconic producer and his equally iconic piece of hardware.

[via dancingastronaut]

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Jermaine Dupri | Drink Champs (Full Episode)

Jermaine Dupri candidly divulges never-before-heard stories behind some of his biggest hits, an everlasting friendship, a studio fail, and past romance with three of the biggest pop queens ever.

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